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8th Class Chapter No 7 - Weavers, Iron Smelters and Factory Owners in History for CBSE NCERT

The crafts and industries of India during British rule focused on two industries-textiles and iron and steel. The industrialisation of Britain had a close connection with the conquest and colonisation of India. In eighteenth centuary India was a leading nation in terms of craft and trade but with industrial revolution Britain came to known as 'Workshop of the world'. With the growth of industrial production, British industrialists began to see India as a vast market for their industrial products, and over the years, manufactured goods from Britain began flooding India. Indian Textiles and the World Market: (i) Around 1750, India was the world's largest producer of cotton textiles. (ii) Indian textile was renowned both for its fine quality and exquisite craftsmanship. (iii) From the 16th century European traders began buying Indian textiles for sale in Europe. Words tell us Histories: (i) Indian textiles were famous in western markets under different names such as 'Muslin' and 'Calico' (derived from Calicut). (ii) Printed cotton cloths called chintz (derived from chhint) produced in Masulipatnam, Andhra Pradesh and bandanna (derived from 'bandhna' or tie and dye) produced in Gujarat and Rajasthan were ordered in bulk
Posted in 8th on February 13 2019 at 03:29 PM

CBSE NCERT 8th CLASS History OTHER CHAPTERS

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